Monday, 23 November 2015

non-GMO layers pellets and pond supplies, Bude Cornwall

I've tried to buy non-GMO1 layers pellets for my poultry in Bude district, North Cornwall and the farm suppliers don't stock them. Likewise the pet shops say I'll have to go to Wadebridge for pond supplies - water filters and pumps, anti fungus treatment for pond fish, etc.

The good news is, Stable Door in Bude stock all these and more!

their opening times:
Opening Times
Monday - Friday·9:00am to 5:00pm
Saturday·9:00am to 12:00pm
Sunday·CLOSED
For a comprehensive list of stock, visit the site: Stable Door Feeds

quote: At Stable Door Feeds we stock a wide range of Horse, Pet and Small Animal feeds, accessories, supplements, treats, bedding and toys. We also stock a comprehensive range of Wild Bird feeds and Feeders to tempt even the most timid of species to your bird table.

 They also supply coal / smokeless fuel.


 1). I have no evidence that GMO soya makes for less healthy hens or eggs. I have plenty of evidence that Monsanto rank their profits and monopoly above all other concerns.

Stable Door also stock poultry food from organic sources.

3 comments :

  1. Ah yes, I was there yesterday and spoke with the proprietor.. Oswald Cobblepot. I asked him for bird feeders which were not so wild. I prefer a more sedate feeder. He recommended the Bosworth model D-12A. I'm highly satisfied with it. Attracting a more refined bird with subdued plumage, the D-12A need only be filled every 2.35 days. Thus saving on bird feed. Since i only buy birdseed grown in the jungles of lower Bozwon ...the Treep region...seed can be rather costly. Yes, the Stable Door is my one stop shop for all my bird needs. (The preceding was highly humorous fiction provided for the masses.) Good day.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I prefer the iDLe-365 model that beeps once a year to remind you to fill it.

    da svee DAN ya (a phonetic goodbye in Russian !)

    ReplyDelete
  3. release of #GMO American chestnut trees have 'unforeseen' consequences for environment? GMO news

    The American chestnut tree fell victim to a Cryphonectria parasitica fungus disease introduced by a foreign chestnut species in the early 20th century

    ReplyDelete

comments welcome; spam is deleted :)